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Cider Chat

Interviewing cidermakers importers, orchardists, foodies, farmers and cider enthusiasts around the world. Let’s delve into the semantics of cider…or is it hard cider, cidre, sidra or fermented apple juice? The truth is out there in Ciderville and we are going to find it. We toast in celebration of cider; As a libation, a gift from the gods, a taste of terroir, and a hard pressed good time. Ready to quench your thirst? Grab a glass and join this chat! See you in Ciderville!
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Now displaying: Page 1
Dec 28, 2016

See all the videos of the Musée du Poiré by visiting the Cider Chat YouTube Channel

The Maison de la Pomme et Poire (House of apple and Pear) was created in 1983 in Barenton by the Normandy-Maine Regional Nature Park.

In June 25, 2016 it reopened, after a bit of new construction, as the Musée du Poiré.

In this chat we discuss the Route du Poiré which can be followed along in this region of Normandy and trying to find the Musée du Poiré.

This adventure began when The Nose and I having only one day left in France, after our chat with Eric Bordelet, decided to head in the opposite direction of where we needed to go, so that we could visit the museum on all things Perry or Poiré, as it is said in French.

The museum has ample parking and is Free and open from April 1st  to October 15th - Do double check as these dates might change.

It is closed on May 1st

Set up a guided tour for the minimal fee of 2.50 (euros)

The museum breaks down the historical path of apples and pears.

The information plaques along the accessible path into the orchard begin with the time when Dinosaurs became extinct around 40-60 million years ago

  • It was then that the first form of wild apples and pears began to grow in the forests of Kazakhstan - around 20,000 BC.....then,
  • Paleolithic times 300,000 -BC - 6000 BC - "the first fruit seduced the first nomads"
  • Neolithic 6000 - 2200 BC Persians transplanted and planted orchards
  • Antiquity 3000 BC - 5th century - This is the time of the Silk Road and the beginning of major trade routes.
  • The Romans are noted as being responsible for the apples arrival in what we know as Spain and then France and of course the UK
  • Middle Ages 5th century to 15th century - Apples are becoming identified and named by pomologists and they are also traveling out into the new worlds.

According to the museum it says that Apples can be traced back to 45 million years. Whereas with pears their history is a bit more of a mystery!

Fun tidbits found at the museum:

  • For a Perry to be worthy of the Domfront Designation the "must" needs to stay in the tanks for 6 weeks to guarantee well-developed aromas.
  • Cider and Perry was poured directly from the barrels during meals either into a pitcher, a ewer, or a jug.
  • At the start of each year the cider and perry was considered to be tasting mild and as each month passed the cider and perry would become stronger as fermentation continued on until the yeast settled down typically in Spring.
  • Cider and Perry were primarily consumed in place and thus they were not bottled.
  • Stablizing the bottle pressure has always been a concerned and it is not until the 1950s that bottling became more widespread, and thus helped cider and perry to be marketed more broadly.
  • Initial fermentation takes place in the barrel. The second fermentation takes place once the cider or perry is bottled and the presence of yeast, often wild yeast as is typical of France products  occurs over a 2-4 month period at the temperature of 10C or  50 degrees F and at this next stage the cider and perry becomes sparkling.
  • Where does the word crab apple come from? Likely from the Old English word Crabbe meaning sour, bitter. Real name is Malus Sylvestris (forest apple)
  • They separate the pears as dessert pears, perry pears and culinary pears which are to be enjoyed on toast or sandwiches!
  • "Gadage" - the name of the crusher used to crush apples and pears. Imagine a large round granite on a pole that is rolled around in a vat of apples by a horse. Look at the Cider Chat YouTube Channel to see The Nose moving the Gadage! and all the other videos associated with this chat!

Contact info for the Musée du Poiré

Website: http://en.normandie-tourisme.fr/pcu/musee-du-poire/barenton/fiche-PCUNOR050FS000TD-2.html?iDD=

Adress:

La Logeraie

50720 BARENTON

Phone : 02 33 59 56 22

Fax : 02 33 59 16 20

And GPS coordinates: N 48 ° 35'16 "- W 0 ° 48'24"

Lemon Mousee Recipe from The New Moosewood Cookbook page 215

Go to the show notes page for this episode to find the full recipe.

Mentions in this podcast

CiderCon February 8th through 10th, 2017

Chicago Cider Summit February 11, 2017

Need a place to stay near the museum or while on the Route du Poiré

Check in to the La Bouissonniere Gite follow them on Twitter @gemofagite

Ask for the following 4 #CiderGoingUP Campaign cider supporters when you next go out to purchase your cider or perry! - By supporting these cidermakers, you in turn help Ciderville.

Big Apple Hard Cider - NYC

Kurant Cider - Pennsylvania

Oliver’s Cider and Perry - Herefordshire/UK

Santa Cruz Cider Company - California

The Cider Project - California

Go to this page to see the ciderchat.com show notes page with photos

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Find this episode and all episodes at the page for Cider Chat's podcasts.

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