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Cider Chat

Interviewing cidermakers importers, orchardists, foodies, farmers and cider enthusiasts around the world. Let’s delve into the semantics of cider…or is it hard cider, cidre, sidra or fermented apple juice? The truth is out there in Ciderville and we are going to find it. We toast in celebration of cider; As a libation, a gift from the gods, a taste of terroir, and a hard pressed good time. Ready to quench your thirst? Grab a glass and join this chat! See you in Ciderville!
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Now displaying: July, 2017
Jul 26, 2017

Please Help Support Cider Chat Please donate today. Help keep the chat thriving!

Find this episode and all episodes at the page for Cider Chat's podcasts.

Simple Cider's is located on the southern tip of Tasmania in a region dripping with Apple history. Tasmania was and is still called the Apple Isle making it the perfect place for makers like Patrick and the team at Simple Ciders to launch into the craft.

The cidery started commercially producing ciders in 2014. It is an orchard based cidery, meaning that the apples are grown right alongside the cider mill. Patrick worked as a system's analysis and then winemaker, after as he says jokingly that he was looking  "for a job that allowed me to get really messy, cold and wet on a regular basis. So I went into making wine and cider."

Simple Cider makes small batch, dry apple cider. The ciders are unfiltered and are naturally carbonated, meaning bottle conditioned. Right now they are making approximately 15,000 litres/year or nearly 4000 gallons.

Patrick says, "The fruit is the story" and after tasting both the Cox's Orange Pippin 7.5% alcohol by volume and the Granny Smith & Ginger 8% abv, I have to agree.

The ciders are delicate and dry..maybe even a bit semi dry...with just the right amount of carbonation.

Tasmania is making a slow comeback in growing cider apples, so makers are working with primarily culinary apples while planting cider varieties.

In this chat Patrick talks about the landscape of Tasmania, the cider scene, his ciders and the Wild Cherry,  which is fermented whole cherries using the carbonic maceration technique of fermenting the fruit with in this case pits and a full layer of CO2. This lends a fruity aroma and taste.

Main chat with Patrick begins at 19:56 minutes

Contact Simple Ciders

website: http://simplecider.com.au/our-story/

email: patrick@simplecider.com.au

Telephone: 0404 990 644

Mentions in this chat

Featured Artist: Emma Ayres at 14:11 minutes

Singing: Route 3

Find out about Emma’s music via the links below

https://emmajunemusic.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/emmajuneband

Ask for the following 7 #CiderGoingUP Campaign cider supporters - By supporting these cider makers, you in turn help Ciderville.

  1. Kurant Cider - Pennsylvania : listen to Joe Getz on episode 14
  2. Big Apple Hard Cider - NYC : listen to Danielle von Scheiner on episode 35
  3. Oliver’s Cider and Perry - Herefordshire/UK ; listen to Tom Oliver on episode 29
  4. Santa Cruz Cider Company - California : listen to Nicole Todd on episode 60
  5. The Cider Project aka EthicCider- California
  6. Albermale CiderWorks : listen to Chuck Shelton on episode 56
  7. Cider Summit : listen to Alan Shapiro founder of this cider fest on episode 75.

 

Listen also at iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher (for Android), iHeartRadio and where ever you love to listen to podcasts.

Follow on twitter @ciderchat

 

 

Jul 19, 2017

Find this episode and all episodes at the page for Cider Chat's podcasts.

Listen also at iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher (for Android), iHeartRadio and where ever you love to listen to podcasts.

Follow on twitter @ciderchat

 

Three guys and an endless supply of credit cards helped build what is today called Artisan Beverage Cooperative (ARTBEV) in Greenfield, Massachusetts. General Manager and co founder Garth Shandyfelt provides an overview on how ARTBEV grew plus;

  • working in a cooperative
  • getting capital to expand via a  direct public offer of stock
  • what is mead
  • what is cyser
  • creating a sustainable model for growth

Started in 2010 making mead, ARTBEV's multi tiered business now produces a range of products to keep stock rolling out the door. Mead and Cyser, for instance, can take upwards to a year or longer to condition, whereas the Ginger Libation made by ARTBEV can be made in two weeks, much like beer.

What is Mead?

Fermented Water, Honey and Yeast or what Garth calls wine made with honey.

"It is a mead if you have more than 50% of your fermentable made with honey."

A Braggot is a beer made with honey and cider

What is Cyser or Cyzer (as ARTBEV calls it - go to 1 hour in on the podcast and find out why)

A cider made with some amount of cider during initial fermentation.

Some cider has honey added for sweetening, but may not be considered a cyser.

How much honey does ARTBEV use yearly?

  • Upwards to 6000 pounds of honey all delivered via 5 gallon buckets

How much honey do you need to make  a 5-gallon batch of mead?

You will need upwards to 12-15 pounds of honey for a 5 gallon batch.

Garth was inspired by Dan Conlon is a key figure in New England working with bees at Warm Colors Apiary.

Books mentioned by Garth in this chat

The Complete Mead Maker by Ken Schramm

2. Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers: The Secrets of Ancient Fermentation, by Stephen Harrod Buhner

Contact Artisan Beverage Cooperative

websitehttp://artbev.coop/

telephone: 413- 773-9700

email: info@artbev.coop

Address:

324 Wells Street

Greenfield, MA

In the same building as Franklin County Community Development Corp.

Tasting Room hours

Friday 4-7pm

Saturday 2-6pm

Ask for the following 7 #CiderGoingUP Campaign cider supporters - By supporting these cider makers, you in turn help Ciderville.

  1. Kurant Cider - Pennsylvania : listen to Joe Getz on episode 14
  2. Big Apple Hard Cider - NYC : listen to Danielle von Scheiner on episode 35
  3. Oliver’s Cider and Perry - Herefordshire/UK ; listen to Tom Oliver on episode 29
  4. Santa Cruz Cider Company - California : listen to Nicole Todd on episode 60
  5. The Cider Project aka EthicCider- California
  6. Albermale CiderWorks : listen to Chuck Shelton on episode 56
  7. Cider Summit : listen to Alan Shapiro founder of this cider fest on episode 75.

Please Help Support Cider Chat Please donate today. Help keep the chat thriving!

 

 

Jul 12, 2017

Please Help Support Cider Chat Please donate today. Help keep the chat thriving!

Find this episode and all episodes at the page for Cider Chat's podcasts.

Cider presses have come in a number of different shapes and forms over the centuries. Listen to episode 78 with Oscar Busto and Mayador in Asturias. A Mayadar (usually a man) crushed apples with a long pole with a blunt end. It was hard laborious work.

The cider press itself might be huge and weigh a ton, such as the presses used at large cider mills where a pole the size of a tree would weigh done upon crushed apples that often would be held in a swath of straw.

Colonist in the New World used a flat stone that was grooved in a circle and fitted a basket. One end always had a spout for the apple juice to pour out.

The common way if you were lucky, was to have a basket press. Even today basket presses are used by both commercial and non commercial cidermakers.

Listen to episode 3 with Robert Colnes as he describes Building a Cider House and making a cloth and rack press.

Read about Worley Cider's blog on their new belt press and see their rack and cloth press.  Their new belt press can process 1.5 tons of apples/hour versus the rack and cloth press the moved through 3 tons of apple per day. Yes presses do evolve.

The maker of the belt press now being used by Worley cider is from Kreuzmayr

Suffice to say, cider presses have evolved over the years, but a tried an true method even today is a basket press.

I have been wanting a press of my own for years now and this week's chat is on an auction and a bid that sent me home with an 1890's cider press from Clark Cutaway Harrow - aka Higganum Manufacturing Company in Connecticut.

But before I was tipped off of on this auction taking place I was looking at making my own. Take a look at the two videos that follow to see just some of the ingenuity that folks are using to make cider. I'm still thinking about using this video below and trying to make this "apple masher" and press.

I hope you enjoy this chat as much as I enjoyed recording it and that it inspires you to not only drink cider, but perhaps try your hand at making cider. And if not that, at least have a deeper appreciation of  the inventors before our time who worked hard at building the perfect cider press. All the photos mentioned can be found via the shownotes for episode 86 on ciderchat.com

Cheers!

Ask for the following 7 #CiderGoingUP Campaign cider supporters - By supporting these cider makers, you in turn help Ciderville.

  1. Kurant Cider - Pennsylvania : listen to Joe Getz on episode 14
  2. Big Apple Hard Cider - NYC : listen to Danielle von Scheiner on episode 35
  3. Oliver’s Cider and Perry - Herefordshire/UK ; listen to Tom Oliver on episode 29
  4. Santa Cruz Cider Company - California : listen to Nicole Todd on episode 60
  5. The Cider Project aka EthicCider- California
  6. Albermale CiderWorks : listen to Chuck Shelton on episode 56
  7. Cider Summit : listen to Alan Shapiro founder of this cider fest on episode 75.

 

Listen also at iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher (for Android), iHeartRadio and where ever you love to listen to podcasts.

Follow on twitter @ciderchat

 

Jul 5, 2017

Subscribe to the Cider Chat newsletter : eCiderNews

Attorney Lindsey Zahn specializes in wine law, but there is no denying that her interest in cider and the laws governing it commerce...and yes these there is a difference between wine and cider!

Her wine Blog On Reserve has been selected as on of the top 100 wine law blogs by the American Bar Association Journal. 

In this chat we discuss:

  • The differences between wine and cider.
  • Gray areas of cider law
  • What comes first the licensing, permitting or trademark of your new cidery?
  • Branding
  • Promotion
  • Certification of Label Approval (COLA)
  • Advertising
  • Social media and how they are subject to government regulation
  • 27 CFR part 4 which is the Labeling and advertising of wine from The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB)
  • Tide House and how it affects regulations on alcohol
  • And, what can Cidermakers do in regards to labeling vintage on their cider?

Contact Lindsey Zahn

email: lazahn@winelawonreserve.com.

On Reserve wine blog http://www.winelawonreserve.com/

The firm that Lindsey works for: Lehrman Beverage Law

Mentions in this chat

Ask for the following 7 #CiderGoingUP Campaign cider supporters - By supporting these cider makers, you in turn help Ciderville.

  1. Kurant Cider - Pennsylvania : listen to Joe Getz on episode 14
  2. Big Apple Hard Cider - NYC : listen to Danielle von Scheiner on episode 35
  3. Oliver’s Cider and Perry - Herefordshire/UK ; listen to Tom Oliver on episode 29
  4. Santa Cruz Cider Company - California : listen to Nicole Todd on episode 60
  5. The Cider Project aka EthicCider- California
  6. Albermale CiderWorks : listen to Chuck Shelton on episode 56
  7. Cider Summit : listen to Alan Shapiro founder of this cider fest on episode 75.

Please Help Support Cider Chat Please donate today. Help keep the chat thriving!

Find this episode and all archived episodes at the page for Cider Chat's podcasts.

Listen also at iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher (for Android), iHeartRadio and where ever you love to listen to podcasts.

Follow on twitter @ciderchat

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