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Cider Chat

Interviewing cidermakers importers, orchardists, foodies, farmers and cider enthusiasts around the world. Let’s delve into the semantics of cider…or is it hard cider, cidre, sidra or fermented apple juice? The truth is out there in Ciderville and we are going to find it. We toast in celebration of cider; As a libation, a gift from the gods, a taste of terroir, and a hard pressed good time. Ready to quench your thirst? Grab a glass and join this chat! See you in Ciderville!
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Now displaying: April, 2017
Apr 26, 2017

The US cider market share in 2017 is growing. This episode on Cider Trends in the US and abroad is a replay of a webinar from April 5, 2017 presented by Danny Brager and Matthew Crompton of the Nielsen Company. The webinar was originally aired by the United States Association of Cider Makers (USACM) for their members. The USACM and Nielsen graciously provided Cider Chat with the main recording so that this critical cider trend data could be shared even more broadly.

Danny is the Senior Vice=President, Beverage Alcohol Practice. Matthew is the Associate Client Director at Nielsen. Together they speak during this 53 minute presentation in conjunction with a visual aide that I recommend you download the pdf file below as it follows along seamlessly with the presentation and provides excellent visuals of Danny and Matthews overview.

Click on photo to view the slides the data charts and visual aides that are referred to throughout this presentation.

What is covered in the podcast episode?

  • What does Nielsen do?
  • How is Beverage Alcohol performing?
  • How is Cider performing in the market?
  • What is driving the growth of Cider?
  • Who is the Cider Consumer and what are they saying?
  • How is Cider performing elsewhere?

Help Nielsen and the USACM get more data on Cider Trends

  1. Provide UPC/label information around the following.

Nielsen information is used and referenced widely in the industry - not just suppliers, but also by retailers, distributors, media (trade and consumer), industry associations, investment firms, etc.  Nielsen wants to ensure that their reported data is accurate, and complete, inclusive of all Cider products in their reporting when it passes a store scanner.

How to help?

If you are selling through retail, you can help Nielsen tell YOUR brands and the HARD CIDER story by ensuring that they have your products coded on their data base.

STEP 1: Nielsen first needs your UPC list so they can check to see whether they already have them coded.  If they do, then no further action is required.

STEP 2:  If not, Nielsen will get back to you, and for those products not already coded on their databases.

They need: your products' labels, usually accomplished by simply having you send digital copies of them (clear PDF images of the back and front labels on the bottle and/or can, as well as package flat (e.g. 4 pack, 6 pack, 12 packs, etc).

Everything you send is confidential, and not shared with anyone other than Nielsen associates to ensure proper coding.

email to:

danny.brager@nielsen.com

margaret.acquaviva@nielsen.com

npcimages@nielsen.com

Ask for the following 6 #CiderGoingUP Campaign cider supporters - By supporting these ciders, you in turn help Ciderville.

  1. Kurant Cider - Pennsylvania : listen to Joe Getz on episode 14
  2. Big Apple Hard Cider - NYC : listen to Danielle von Scheiner on episode 35
  3. Oliver’s Cider and Perry - Herefordshire/UK ; listen to Tom Oliver on episode 29
  4. Santa Cruz Cider Company - California : listen to Nicole Todd on episode 60
  5. The Cider Project aka EthicCider- California
  6. Albermale CiderWorks : listen to Chuck Shelton on episode 56

Please Help Support Cider Chat Please donate today. Help keep the chat thriving!

Find this episode and all episodes at the page for Cider Chat's podcasts.

Listen also at iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher (for Android), iHeartRadio and where ever you love to listen to podcasts.

Follow on twitter @ciderchat

 

 

 

Apr 19, 2017

Lou and Sue Chadwick of Second Chance Farm in Greenfield Massachusetts are what I consider the "Apple Pied Pipers". For nearly as long as CiderDays (the oldest cider event in the US) has been running I have seen the Chadwicks touting the bounty of apple varieties. This means they have dozen of fresh picked apples on a long table, that they set up outside no less in early November and welcome everyone to stop by  to take a look and try a taste of a Razor Russet, Baldwin or Arkansas Black. If you get a chance to attend CiderDays make sure you say hi to this lovely couple.

In this week's chat I recorded a walkabout with the Chadwick's at their Second Chance farm where for the past 12 years they have been nursing small apple varieties and grafting an assortment of rare cider apples ( at least rare right now in 2017 for the US).

Lou made a Rind Graft, a V Graft and an Omega Graft.

Take a look at the Cider Chat YouTube channel to see Lou in action.

See the photos of this chat via ciderchat.com post link here

The Chadwicks have been orchardists long before Second Chance Farm. Sue's grandfather has a farm with apple trees in Buckland Massachusetts that they still advise and help the current owners.

Before the walk in the orchard I delve into the winemaking technique known as Bâtonnage.

Bâtonnage defined is simply stirring the lees periodically. This technique can be used in cidermaking and is done after the initial vigorous fermentation is complete.

The lees is brown slurry that settles to the bottom of carboy, stainless steel tanks or barrels. It is comprised of dead yeast cells and heavy particles that were initially floating in the solution.

There are two different types of lees

Gross Lees - the first drop of heavy precipitants that float to the bottom.

Fine Lees - the slurry that can form on the bottom of your carboy after the first racking.

If you leave the lees on the bottom of your cidermaking vessels there is a risk of the lees consuming all the oxygen and causing hydrogen sulfide to form as the cider goes through the process of reduction. (Yes, lees consumes oxygen). The result can leave an off smell such as rotten eggs.

Contact info for Second Chance Farm

luandsu9@comcast.net

Ask for the following 6 #CiderGoingUP Campaign cider supporters - By supporting these cider makers, you in turn help Ciderville.

  1. Kurant Cider - Pennsylvania : listen to Joe Getz on episode 14
  2. Big Apple Hard Cider - NYC : listen to Danielle von Scheiner on episode 35
  3. Oliver’s Cider and Perry - Herefordshire/UK ; listen to Tom Oliver on episode 29
  4. Santa Cruz Cider Company - California : listen to Nicole Todd on episode 60
  5. The Cider Project aka EthicCider- California
  6. Albermale CiderWorks : listen to Chuck Shelton on episode 56

Please Help Support Cider Chat Please donate today. Help keep the chat thriving!

Find this episode and all episodes at the page for Cider Chat's podcasts.

Listen also at iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher (for Android), iHeartRadio and where ever you love to listen to podcasts.

Follow on twitter @ciderchat

Apr 12, 2017

Alan Shapiro wasn't looking to get involved in cider, being a craft beer enthusiast, one sip at the right time changed his mind and he isn’t looking back. He is founder of the widely popular Cider Summits that takes place currently in 4 major US cities (with a 5th city expected to come on board soon). His roots in libations began taking stock while working as one of the first sales representative for Pete’s Brewing Company ( does Pete's Wicked Ale sound familar?) which helped him cultivate a relationship with Mark Browner, whom he credits with planting the seed for today's Cider Summits.

In 2003 he founded SBS Imports and secured the rights to import Aspall Cyder of Suffolk, England . He says after a visit to this legendary cidery in Suffolk,  “I had what I call a ‘Wow Moment’ when I realized that cider has more to offer than what I had expected.

In 2012 Artisanal Imports of Austin acquired SBS Imports. The first Summit had already taken place two years earlier in 2010. From the start that first Summit was a hit. Alan says he scrambled to get 40 cider products and wasn’t sure what to exactly to expect for crowd size, but when nearly 500 people showed up, it was an obvious success. Since, the locations where this cider festival takes place has expanded to locations in Portland, Chicago and San Francisco.

This chat covers the beginnings of Alan's journey to founding Cider Summit, what to expect at the Summit and his take on the current cider market.

What to expect at a Cider Summit

  • Souvenair glass  for 4 ounce pours
  • Tasting Tokens
  • Usually 100-150 ciders available from 50 cider companies more or less
  • There is a guide that is published a few days before

How to attend a Cider Summit? Have a strategy

  • Download the Summit guide that is published a few days before the event.
  • Each festival has a local/regional focus.
  • Go for local ciders. Or specific styles, such as Asturias ciders or French, fruit ciders, hopped ciders.
  • Additional tokens are available for $2/token
  • There is also a VIP ticket too, where attendees can have conversations with the cidermakers attending.
  • There is a bottle to go shop at all the Summits except for Chicago.

Cider Summits locations and dates for 2017

All Summits are outdoors events, except for Chicago’s

Chicago  Saturday February 11th at the Navy Pier

San Francisco Saturday April 22nd at the Presidio

Portland   Friday & Saturday, June 16-17 at Fields Neighborhood Park

Seattle  Friday & Saturday, Sept 8-9 at South Lake Union Discovery Center Lawn

Contact for Alan Shapiro and Cider Summit

email: CiderSummit@earthlink.net

Twitter: @cidersummit

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cidersummit/?ref=br_rs

Mentions in this chat

De Vergeten Appel a Netherlands cidery in Tilburg

Neilsen webinar recording Cider Trends in the US and abroad and download the pdf file that goes along with this recording here

Use code LyftCiderChat for Up to $50 off your first ride with the Lyft rideshare program. Find the details on this code offering and how to use via this link

Ask for the following 6 #CiderGoingUP Campaign cider supporters - By supporting these cider makers, you in turn help Ciderville.

  1. Kurant Cider - Pennsylvania : listen to Joe Getz on episode 14
  2. Big Apple Hard Cider - NYC : listen o Danielle von Scheiner on episode 35
  3. Oliver’s Cider and Perry - Herefordshire/UK ; listen to Tom Oliver on episode 29
  4. Santa Cruz Cider Company - California : listen to Nicole Todd on episode 60
  5. The Cider Project aka EthicCider- California
  6. Albermale CiderWorks : listen to Chuck Shelton on episode 56

Please Help Support Cider Chat Please donate today. Help keep the chat thriving!

Find this episode and all episodes at the page for Cider Chat's podcasts.

Listen also at iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher (for Android), iHeartRadio and where ever you love to listen to podcasts.

Follow on twitter @ciderchat

 

Apr 5, 2017

Nicole and Rafe Ward of Forgotten Ciders are celebrating 3 years of cidermaking this April of 2017.  This Michigan cidery has over 1000 variety of apples growing on 16 acres, many of which are cider varieties and red fleshed to boot!

Rafe's Grandfather Douglas Eastman and Uncle John Eastman started planting apples trees 30 years ago to what would one day become Eastman Antique Apples.  Eight years ago Rafe, his parents and brother bought the apple orchard. After getting involved in the family's orchard, Rafe Ward began making cider in their basement and then realized that the fruit could be transformed in to liquid gold.

Rafe says, "It was a happy day when I realized I own an orchard and I could make alcohol out of them apples."

Nicole mentions, "It was good fortune that the family didn't pull up the apple trees thinking that because they didn't taste good they weren't worth growing."

Forgotten Ciders are made out of a 100% fresh pressed apple juice. Aside from adding yeast, there is no back sweetening or sugar added up front. The brilliant shades of red that are visible in their bottles of Mad Russian, Hot N Cider and others is derived straight from the apple varieties that they are using.

Ah Ha Moments for the Wards

1. Licensing

2. Making the cider - but they "Let the apples do the work"

Cidery Overview

  • 16 acres with over 1000 varieties
  • They pick the apples themselves with some help
  • Use stainless steel tanks and ICBs (plastic containers)
  • Press using an 18 inch rack and cloth press.
  • They press throughout the season, with the season going through mid November.

Ciders Mentioned in this chat all in 750 ml bottles except for the Hopped Cider

1.Mad Russian - 6.9% early season cider Flagship cider

Deep cranberry color, using red flesh apples

Giant Russian Crab apples

Taste, aggressively dry and tart up front and then mellows and sweetens as you drink it.

2. Private Stash - 6.9% has over 150 varieties blended to make this cider.

3. Hot N Cider 6.9% made with a base cider and local peppers. A very smooth easy drinking cider, with just the right amount of hot to make your palate ask for more cider. Pairs perfectly with cheese plate.

4. Rusty Red made with Russet apples that Nicole describes having a skin much akin to potato or pear as opposed to being shiny and glossy like a Red Delicious apple. They blend their Russets with some of their "Red Flesh" apples.

5. Hopped Cider - 6.9% base cider with dry hops. Well balanced citrus notes of the hops with a very tasty cider base.

Find Forgotten Ciders

Visit the Forgotten Ciders Tasting Room  opening this year on April 29th!

Usually only open only on Saturdays from 2-7 once the season begins

Look to the website for special events open from summer to November.

Farmer's Markets

Getting to Forgotten Ciders

  • 2 hour drive from Detroit
  • 4.5 hour drive from Chicago

Mini Tips mentioned for ciders in this chat

Tips for Planting an orchard

  • Place same varieties together
  • Plant is succession to ripening dates

Tips for making Labels

Contact Forgotten Ciders and Eastman Antique Apples

Owners: Nicole and Rafe Ward

Address: 1068 W Midland-Gratiot County Line Rd, Wheeler, MI 48662

Phone: (989) 842-5576

email: forgottenciders@gmail.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EastmansForgottenCiders/

Ask for the following 6 #CiderGoingUP Campaign cider supporters - By supporting these cider makers, you in turn help Ciderville.

  1. Kurant Cider - Pennsylvania : listen to Joe Getz on episode 14
  2. Big Apple Hard Cider - NYC : listen to Danielle von Scheiner on episode 35
  3. Oliver’s Cider and Perry - Herefordshire/UK ; listen to Tom Oliver on episode 29
  4. Santa Cruz Cider Company - California : listen to Nicole Todd on episode 60
  5. The Cider Project aka EthicCider- California
  6. Albermale CiderWorks : listen to Chuck Shelton on episode 56

Please Help Support Cider Chat Please donate today. Help keep the chat thriving!

Find this episode with photos and all episodes at the Cider Chat's podcasts page.

Listen also at iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher (for Android), iHeartRadio and where ever you love to listen to podcasts.

Follow on twitter @ciderchat

 

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